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News archive

  • 27 Sep 2017
    When tribunal fees were introduced in 2013, claims dropped by 70%. Now the fees have been abolished the signs appear to suggest an increase in claims. In the last few weeks alone we've seen client cases we would have expected to have fizzled out quietly instead hit the ACAS Early Conciliation phase, a necessary step prior to tribunal proceedings.

  • 27 Sep 2017
    The abolition of tribunal fees and the inevitable increase in litigation means employers should use extra caution when approaching employee dismissals whether by redundancy or any other reason. Our article explains the pros and cons of the voluntary exit agreement Vs the more formal Settlement Agreement.

  • 18 Sep 2017
    The office dog. At myHRdept we’ve always brought a dog to the office. At one stage 3 of them! Is having a dog in the office a good idea? Or barking mad? Our briefing covers the key considerations and our own experiences.

  • 1 Sep 2017
    Following Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council v Willetts and others it is now time for employers to review their holiday pay practices in relation to holiday pay. The previous situation (we reported in 2014) was that only compulsory or guaranteed overtime payments should be included in holiday pay calculations. In 2015 a Northern Irish tribunal ruled that voluntary overtime should be included, and whilst this was perhaps the writing on the wall, tribunal decisions are not binding, so we had to wait for the first Employment Appeal Tribunal ruling, which we’ve now had. Our full article contains a briefing on what employers should do next.

  • 15 Aug 2017
    what can an employer reasonably expect an employee to do (other than their normal duties) and at what point could the employee throw in the towel and claim constructive dismissal on grounds of loss of status? Our article looks at the flexibility employers might be able to expect in the context of case law around 'suitable alternative employment.'